Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special

Mar 25th, 2013
11 Comments

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special


Commodity
Identity and supporting marques.

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special


Men’s Collection
Product design, packaging and art-direction.
Photography by Luke Pearsall

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special


Women’s Collection
Product design, packaging and art-direction.
Photography by Luke Pearsall

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special


Commodity
Brand Iconography

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special

Commodity × Ferroconcrete — SI Special


Commodity
Product development sketches

Behind the Brand

We [Commodity] worked hand-in-hand with Ferroconcrete to create not not only the brand, but also the complete e-commerce experience. This wasn’t a typical client/agency relationship as Yolanda Santosa (founder & creative director of Ferroconcrete) is also one of the co-founders of Commodity.

We noticed that the fragrance industry had been almost untouched by the digital age. The market seemed to be saturated with shirtless male models and lofty slogans—so we set about creating a modern brand of scents that felt accessible even for people who aren’t into fragrances. Eventually we want to bring people in to the creation process and let them vote on an ever-changing range of scents.

The problem is you can’t smell what you see online, so the biggest challenge was to design the service itself. We came up with the idea for an online service that lets people live with multiple scents in their daily lives. It made finding a great fragrance easy by letting you discover scents based on your own style, sample them in the comfort of your own home, and then have your choices delivered to your doorstep. We named the brand “Commodity” to bring a sense of honesty back to the industry. Each scent is simply named after a real commodity or an abstract one.

Behind the Design

For the 20 fragrances to truly shine, the design had to be simple and humble. When it came to the packaging, we opted for minimal and ergonomic shapes. We decided to highlight the name of each commodity without adding any superfluous elements. Even the exterior packaging puts an emphasis on content, highlighting the volume (30ml or 100ml). To bring warmth and familiarity, we used leather or suede for the ‘Roller’ carrying case. It feels like a trusty wallet and only gets better as it ages.

Typefaces Used

Logotype: Customised Novecento
Primary Typeface: Tiempos
Secondary Typeface: Alternate Gothic No 3 & Novecento

A Note from the Editor

If I’m honest, I rarely ever see Kickstarter projects (of this nature) that are the “complete package” — a great idea brought to life by beautifully executed product design and branding. So when I first set eyes upon Commodity, something within me just clicked. Not only did I appreciate what they were they trying to do as a company, I also couldn’t help but admire the effort they put into the branding of this venture — when a product label has the power to make you reach for your wallet, they’re clearly doing something right ;) Suffice to say, it made sense to give the hard-working ladies and gents (of Commodity) a feature on SI and maybe, just maybe, earn them some new fans in the process :)

Thank you once again to Owen for putting all the imagery and text together for this feature and best of luck reaching $50k!

Commodity on Kickstarter
www.commoditygoods.com
www.ferro-concrete.com


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11 Comments

  1. Jenna

    This all looks lovely…it’s just a shame that they didn’t take the time to properly kern Commodity.

  2. Daniel

    Lovely work from Yo and the team. I don’t know if I should get the women’s set as well… !

  3. David

    @Jenna – Kerning is arguably subjective — it’s all about what feels right to your eye. If I were to be overly critical however, I would adjust the space between “C O M M” so that it matches “D I T Y” and vice versa. That being said, perhaps this was intentional and there is a reason behind the irregular details. Wabi-sabi kerning perhaps? ;)

  4. Dan

    Reminds me a little of Monocle, which isn’t a bad thing.

    However, I’m not sure how customising fonts, and using a premium/luxury aesthetic equates with being a commodity.

  5. David

    @Dan – That’s an interesting point. I’d imagine that, as they’ve set out to do something new within this particular industry (offer a premium product without the traditional markup) they are, in turn, trying to redefine what a “commodity” is. I’ll have to wait for Owen to get back to me on that one!

  6. Owen

    @Jenna
    Ah, we knew someone would bring that up :) It was a balancing act to optically balance the “O” so that it would feel about centered. Even with the modifed “M”, anytime we kerned out the “C O M M” it felt left heavy. We’ll probably re-draw it at some point down the line.

  7. Owen

    Hi Dan & David
    Good notes. The name Commodity originally came from us wanting to make high-end luxury items as accessible as common goods. The online service and pricing was our way of democratizing fragrance for all. At the same time, we wanted the product itself to still feel premium even without the premium price-tag. Also it feels more humble than “Obsession” or “Fierce” ;)

  8. Not only is the project great, also the image and graphics are beautiful and honest. It makes me love the brand.

  9. ramon

    Really nice work, but bad kerning of the logo, and this is not subjective, it’s basic typographic laws. And yes, totally Monocle 2.0, which in not bad I suppose. Still, I’d buy the fragrances as it’s a godo concept and looks good.

  10. Nicholas

    While kearning is subjective, the logotype just looks lazy. But I do really like the project.

  11. Minimalistic yet sexy packaging design on the Commodity range. I do get a feeling of “ink” from the “for him”-range though.

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