SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

Oct 20th, 2010
14 Comments

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

‘Graphic Design for Fashion’
By Jay Hess and Simone Pasztorek
Design byBOTH AKA Jay Hess & Simone Pasztorek
Photography PSC Photography

As the title implies, Graphic Design for Fashion opens the door to the world of graphic design for fashion bringing together a well-curated selection of contemporary work, accompanied by interviews in which the studios reveal something of their process for expressing themselves creatively and exclusive insights into the projects themselves – similar to the way I do things on SI.

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

[column width="48%" padding="3%"]Jay on the ‘The Cover’
[/column] [column width="48%" padding="0%"]“The cover was printed with three or 4 spot colours with an exposed trimmed edge. The front cover has the graphic design studio names debossed and the reverse has the fashion designers names.

We intentionally did not put our names on the front cover, because it just did not fit in the design, it was so tight… We did want our credit on the spine to wrap into the back cover to link it into the design of the back cover, YES, the publisher was horrified… But this is the benefit of being author and designer, you only step on your own toes…

Overall, we wanted a cover that people want to pick up, this is achieved by the colour… Structurally though, it is completely in line with what we have been doing on the inside. The cover shows best the scale of the objects too, which was painstakingly maintained throughout each page so it feels like all the objects were simply laying down next to each other.”
[/column] [end_columns]

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

The book leads in with some nice, glossy endpapers, before getting right down to business on some heavy uncoated stock denoting chapter intros, followed by lighter uncoated stock for the image-heavy chapters, as Jay explains: “We settled for two weights of uncoated woodfree paper – lighter for the chapters and heavier for the chapter intro pages – to try and create a bit of a subtle click as you flick through the pages, so you know where the chapter begins and ends.”

Inside each chapter (there are 4) is a perfectly formed selection of branding, invitations, lookbooks and packaging with lovely, full-bleed colour images of each project photographed by PSC Photography. “The book simply would not be the same with supplied imagery,” says Jay. “We just wanted all the work to be equal, on a level playing field which is not possible with supplied imagery. We have not just shown the best bits in extreme close up, we have tried to show the body of work; a collective body of graphic design for fashion.”

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

[column width="48%" padding="3%"]Design: Acne Art Department
[/column] [column width="48%" padding="0%"]This is a small selection of the vast array of branding material. Clockwise from top right are jeans labels, denim buttons, a compliments slips and a receipt envelope.
[/column] [end_columns]

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

[column width="48%" padding="3%"]Design: Anothercompany
[/column] [column width="48%" padding="0%"]While the debut issue N°0 was only available digitally, the success of Journal de Nîmes justified its launch into a quarterly duotone newspaper. With an oversized format of 30 x 42cm, the publication explores the aesthetic world of Tenue de Nîmes. Like the brand, denim is the primary focus, yet related products and accessories are features as well. The magazine allows in-depth analysis of the heritage and projected future of denim.
[/column] [end_columns]

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

[column width="48%" padding="3%"]Design: Anothercompany
[/column] [column width="48%" padding="0%"]Relevant to the materiality and hardwearing qualities of denim, this special heavyweight cotton bag reinforces the brand values outside the retail environment. Attention to detail is shown by the notably shorter handles to provide more balanced proportions.
[/column] [end_columns]

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

[column width="48%" padding="3%"]Design: DEEVA-HA
[/column] [column width="48%" padding="0%"]Letterheads feature a hand-stamped logo with varying degrees of legibility, reaffirming the unconventional aesthetic of GAR—DE. Additional information is printed at the top and bottom of the page further distancing the material from standard expectations.
[/column] [end_columns]

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

[column width="48%" padding="3%"]Design: DEEVA-HA
[/column] [column width="48%" padding="0%"]Each business card features the logo in a slightly different position. The dash stretches to the back of the card, reinforcing the three-dimensionality of the project.
[/column] [end_columns]

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

[column width="48%" padding="3%"]Design: Antoine+Manuel
[/column] [column width="48%" padding="0%"]Creative component of the Prêt-à-Porter Spring/Summer 2007 invitation emphasizing the intricate layering Antoine+Manuel bring to every season.
[/column] [end_columns]

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

[column width="48%" padding="3%"]Design: Paul Boudens for Haider Ackermann
[/column] [column width="48%" padding="0%"]Using a standard envelope format and maintaining a consistent design approach, Boudens infuses every invitation with the personality of the collection, employing a variety of embossing and foils on thick board.
[/column] [end_columns]

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

[column width="48%" padding="3%"]Design: Paul Boudens for Yohji Yamamoto
[/column] [column width="48%" padding="0%"]With central perforations these A5 cards were delivered in translucent metallic envelopes. Boudens invests heavily in the materiality of each project.
[/column] [end_columns]

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

[column width="48%" padding="3%"]Design: Small
[/column] [column width="48%" padding="0%"]The men’s collection is seasonally presented in Paris as a static exhibitions. For the invitations Small use the details of the installation or venue as inspiration. The Spring/Summer 2009 collection presentation was fixed to large wooden boards with punched holes that went on to influence the invititation. “The invitations have relevance to the location but do not give much away about the collection.”
[/column] [end_columns]

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

[column width="48%" padding="3%"]Design: Julia Born
[/column] [column width="48%" padding="0%"]“The concept for the design is very simple: we show ten life-sized photographs throughout the book. The cut-up posters, piled up and folded together into the book generate a dramaturgy and layout where new combinations and figures are invented on each spread. It’s almost a remake – a ‘Part 2′ as it were – of the collection itself with new pieces of clothing, poses, fabrics, etc. The system of compiling is subtly visible when the ‘narrative’ goes from head, down to feet, and back again.”
[/column] [end_columns]

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

[column width="48%" padding="3%"]Design: Manuel Raeder for BLESS
[/column] [column width="48%" padding="0%"]The 11th issue of Pacemaker from MArch 2006 hosted the combined N° 28 ‘Climate Confusion Assistance’ and N° 29 ‘wallscapes’ BLESS lookbook. The A2 poster format was folded down to A5 in the same way as the host magazine. “The presentation of the new collection happened in Paris during fashion week inside a gallery in fron of wallpapers by BLESS. Due to that we designed two posters printed back and front, with images mixed of the wallscapes and the presentation. Almost like opening up another space, making the confusion between where the model’s are standing and the where the wallpapers with BLESS objects start even more confusing.”
[/column] [end_columns]

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

[column width="48%" padding="3%"]Design: Plug-In Graphic for Journal Standard
[/column] [column width="48%" padding="0%"]“The material used for the cover is waxed, brown craft paper, which gives the book a unique feel when touched. When I cannot find the paper with the right texture, I sometimes use printing techniques to create the ideal texture, and this is one such example.” The Autumn/Winter 2005/06 Journal Standard lookbook was also embellished with scribbles on the page to establish a used aesthetic. A shift in the team saw Ryotaro Horiuchi take over the photography of the publication.
[/column] [end_columns]

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

[column width="48%" padding="3%"]Design: Plug-In Graphic for Journal Standard
[/column] [column width="48%" padding="0%"]A fluctuating mix of paper stocks and contextual content builds a strong narrative around the Spring/Summer 2009 Journal Standard Luxe collection. At 17.5 x 24cm the quarter-bound hardcover lookbook feels more academic than fashion.
[/column] [end_columns]

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

[column width="48%" padding="3%"]Design: Homework for Fleur Tang
[/column] [column width="48%" padding="0%"]“Fleur Tang garments and packaging are made with 100 percent organic materials. From the cotton in the mills to the manufacturing, every process is done with the environment in mind – and without harmful chemicals. A piece of clothing with peace of mind.: – The minimal design aesthetic features a single logo embossed onto each package. Substantial effort was invested in developing an innovative closure for the box to enhance the uniqueness of the experience.
[/column] [end_columns]

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

[column width="48%" padding="3%"]Design: Marque
[/column] [column width="48%" padding="0%"]The Victor Alfaro shoe range features complementary casual and luxury collections. To emphasize this distinction two independent shoebox designs were produced. Each line required ballet-, regular-, and boot-sized boxes.
[/column] [end_columns]

SI Exclusive: Graphic Design for Fashion

[column width="48%" padding="3%"]Design: Mind Design
[/column] [column width="48%" padding="0%"]“Tom had a large influence on the design of the packaging but gave us total freedom in the actual graphics and typography. For the Eco Polo we did not want to use ant printing on the packaging and labels at all, so the design was embossed into a recycled, egg carton-like material. For the Techno Polo Tom suggested a silver, vacuum-packed foil packaging that was screen-printed.”
[/column] [end_columns]

The kind of book where you can jump in anywhere, GD for Fashion is an accessible, easy read and the layout complements it so well. As Jay explains: “The book is broken into four chapters, from that, we made a quadrant typographic grid, each chapter, and each quad, adopting a weight from Franklin Gothic. It was broken down very simply and very quickly, nothing fussy, but a subtle evolution through the book.” It has to be said that the quadrant typographic system employed throughout the book is a slight departure from what I’m used to but it works really well.

There was very, very little I didn’t like in GD for Fashion, but the things I did like more than made up for it! This is a testament to how much time and energy went in to the making of this tome and its a fine example of how to do a curated “best of” compendium right. If this is Mr. Hess and Miss Pasztorek’s first book then the future looks bright for these two authors/designers.

Highly rated for your 606 Universal Shelving System this autumn/fall. ;)

I hope you (dear reader) took something away from this review and enjoyed this SI Exclusive – this is just a small glimpse of what you can expect in the book! Keep your eyes peeled for more super-high-res images on the SI Flickr Gallery some time this week! I’d also like to take a few seconds to thank Lewis @Laurence King for sending me a copy of this beauty and author: Jay for sending me the high-res photographs and design info. Cheers gents!

Graphic design for Fashion is available online at Laurence King and at all good book shops.

If you’re new here, don’t forget to Subscribe & follow SI on Twitter for your weekly dose of visual crack. Spreading the love via FFFFOUND! is also encouraged here. ;)


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14 Comments

  1. Nice! I was planing on buying that book. Although, I’m tired of seing that Tom Dixon thing… It’s been years now…

  2. David

    @Encinas You work a lot in fashion, so you will definitely enjoy this book! In terms of the quality it’s up there with ‘Materials, Process, Print’ and ‘Look at This’ – 2 of my favourite LK titles.

  3. Will

    I wasn’t sure what to expect with this book but after seeing this, I’m definitely going to pick up a copy. Looks great!

  4. Ah, this book has been on my ‘to get’ list for some time now. It’s nice to see some work from Jay and Simone while their site’s being worked on. Although I don’t mind placeholders!

    Great post!

  5. Xavier

    I love this things, really nice. Great post!

  6. David, you’ve gone and done it again, great feature and a lovely looking book, now on my wish list, hope all is well.

  7. Loving the choice of materials for the Tom Dixon project by Mind Design. I believe full credit should go to the printers though – as with most of the work featured.

  8. Great post, as always. Wouldn’t expect anything less…
    It’s interesting to see the typographic development in this sector.
    Several of the pieces shown here uses Franklin / News Gothic. Feels like I’ve seen that one quite a lot lately in fashion-related design, nonetheless suiting and good looking.

  9. Some great stuff here. Looks really good!

  10. Great post! Thanks one more time

  11. What an excellent collection of graphic design examples!

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