Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Mar 22nd, 2012
10 Comments

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase


Identity Website
New website designed and developed for Identity Press containing a beautiful collection of print work by various design studios (Ico, Marque, Spin, Design Assembly, Spring, Designwerk, Mulberry in-house, Powell Allen, etc).

www.identityprint.co.uk

Copywriting
 by Regard
Design by Morse Studio
Photography
 by Lee Mawdsley

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase


280 High Holborn — Marketing literature
280 High Holborn is an residential development in Central London. The theme of high specification carries through into the marketing materials.

This large-format brochure was printed on PhoeniXmotion Xenon and features a number of finer details, including a short cover in Colourplan Real Grey with a Sandgrain emboss, laser-cut numerals and green thread-sewn binding.

Designed by Spin (spin.co.uk)

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase


Heron Tower — 
Marketing literature
Heron Tower is a newly-built, state-of-the-art commercial tower in the City of London. The marketing materials reflect the scale and ambition of the project.

The book is case-bound with a metallic stock and is housed in a bespoke wrapped box, which features a matching lining paper and marker ribbon. The print remit involved large-scale full-colour work, consistent solids across a variety of stocks and typographic details in holographic foil.

Designed by ico Design (icodesign.com)

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase


Lascivious Lingerie
 — Spring/Summer 07 lookbook
Lascivious produce exquisite handmade lingerie. Attention to detail is the brand’s key quality, which naturally translates into design and print.

The saddle-stitched book is an intriguing combination of tactile paper stocks, short pages and an oversized cover. A mixture of black and white and colour photographs are printed on Naturalis Absolute White Smooth.

Designed by Marque (marquecreative.com)

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase


McDonald’s 
Colour Code Guidelines
As part of a major change in strategy, McDonald’s introduced a new colour directive, illustrated beautifully in this comprehensive guidelines kit.

The format, as with most guidelines documents, is an updatable binder. However, this one features a magnetic closure and a cover bound in custom-dyed cloth. Other special features include clear, white and yellow foil blocking throughout, a throw-out contents page and a routed foam panel to carry a selection of interior material samples.

Designed by Morse Studio (morsestudio.com)

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase


Mulberry
Autumn/Winter 11 invitation
Mulberry may have roots embedded in English heritage, but the brand is truly progressive. This invitation shook the preconceptions of accepted formats.

Packaged in a black covered box with a slip lid, this invitation is quite an elaborate piece of hand-finished paper engineering. The only way to describe it is as a ‘fortune-teller’ format, where the corners unfold to reveal the various details of the event. The finely-detailed artwork is produced in a combination of foil blocking in metallic gold and screen-printed white on black uncoated stock.

Designed by Mulberry in-house design team

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase


Osman Yousefzada Spring/Summer 12 lookbook
Afghan-British fashion designer, Osman Yousefzada, is British fashion’s best- kept secret. Like his work, this book is simple, crafted but attention-grabbing.

Full-page images, image textures and solids are printed on Naturalis, and the loose sheets are scored and collated as an A3 format magazine.

Designed by Spring

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase


Panthalassa
 — Marketing literature
Panthalassa is a 184 foot luxury super-yacht with interiors by Foster and Partners. The sophisticated marketing materials present her in suitable style.

The case-bound book is wrapped in Winter & Company’s Napura Khepra Madera, a wood-textured cover material, while their Papvr stock in pale blue was used for the end papers. The text stock is Mohawk Superfine Ultrawhite Eggshell. Other finishing details include an extremely delicate foil blocking in metallic blue, an Astralux slip sleeve and internal short pages.

Designed by Powell Allen (powellallen.com)

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase


Design Assembly — 3
Design Assembly was a challenging online design forum. This printed archive celebrates their third and final year in action.

The book comprises three different-sized volumes, glued together as one book. The three constituent parts each have a different binding method: Centre-sewn, PUR-bound (Polyurethane reactive glue) and naked-bound (without a hard cover). The combination of single-colour and full-colour print is complemented by foil blocked detailing in a gunmetal finish.

Designed by Matt Judge (madebyassembly.com)

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase


Design Museum — 
Wim Crouwel retrospective invitation
Identity were the official printers of the Design Museum’s highly anticipated Wim Crouwel retrospective in 2011.

The invitation comprised a triplexed Colorplan board, a large-scale foil blocking in silver and a wraparound dust jacket, also in Colorplan.

Designed by Spin (spin.co.uk)

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase

Identity — Website and Print Showcase


UEFA Champions League
 — Brand Guidelines
The official UEFA Champions League brand guidelines has become the benchmark for best practice within the sports marketing industry.

Two hardback books are housed in hinged slip cases, which are wrapped in Perigrina Majestic, lined with suede and finished with silver ribbons, glued in under the lining. Incorporated within the books is a football-shaped USB device, which sits in a kiss-cut recess in the double thickness cover board, and a folded A1 poster in a pocket. The print includes silver litho and silver foil blocking.

Designed by Designwerk (designwerk.co.uk)

No additional words from editor because he’s busy…

But I will say thank you to Hugh for taking the time to send all the imagery and text over ;)

ADDITIONAL LINKS WORTH CHECKING OUT

Hugh Morse SI Special #1
Hugh Morse Recent Projects Special Feature
morsestudio.com


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10 Comments

  1. Gorgeous. Hope we have a chance to commission work from this printer one day.

  2. Exceptional print work and very educational. I particularly like the way they’ve made the conventional, horizontal scrolling format on their site much more engaging – with the clean typography and flexible grid. Nice find!

  3. Much as I’m thrilled to (finally) see ‘creative printers’ (Identity, Generation Print, Team et al), I have to ask, “What took you so long?”

    Was it because your inner creativity took so long to blossom or because mass-culture is currently revering crafts? Or is it because there’s no longer any easy work around?

    Creatively-focussed printers are only a good thing and should be applauded, but it should be noted that when they had a choice–twenty years ago, when they were required to do nothing more than colour reproduction–they didn’t want to know. So, really, is their passion just pragmatism?

    Technology is forcing us to re-think print back to its very invention. Gutenberg’s vision of an egalitarian information-distribution medium is actually the Internet–that’s what he should have invented in 1450.

    Fifteen years ago when we opened ARTOMATIC+ in Clerkenwell, we dreamed of a world where everything was thread-sewn and luscious. That was then. Now we think about how printed matter meets the needs of a digitally-dominated culture–and it’s not a bit of 200 point Helvetica 95 foil-blocked onto Winters book-cloth.

    What vision do these printers have for the future and does it reach beyond the finance agreements on their presses? If the current indulgence for craft and texture is just a fad, then what’s going to feed the presses when it’s faded?

  4. Beautiful materials and craftmanship!

  5. Paul Winter

    ‘Thrilled’ = Sour Grapes

  6. Paul,

    Yes, there is a certain sourness to the grapes. I’m sure you would feel the same–we worked long and hard and spent a small fortune to blaze this particular trail. It would be nice to have a little more than a two-word response–is that all you have to contribute to the discussion?

    Tim

  7. Tim,

    just to clear things up, we have been producing work like this for 14 years, as time has gone on we have grown as a company and produced more high profile work but technically difficult work has always been our speciality. I have always been an admirer of your company so it’s a bit of a shame you haven’t researched us a bit more before leaving your earlier comments, I think it’s a good thing that more print companies are stepping up to the plate and producing exquisite pieces that match the vision of today’s finest designers.

    Kevin

  8. Kevin

    Thanks for the added info, but that’s my point–we had already been doing this work for fourteen years when you started. We predicted and championed a renewed interest in the craft of producing creative work because had our own vision that a more textural approach was a more authentic use of print–when litho printers were only interested in colour reproduction (80′s)–and that it would become more valuable in a digital age (90′s, 00′s).

    No doubt it’s a good thing that printers are matching the vision of designers, but my question is, where is the printers’ vision for the future? It’s their (your) industry, after all.

    Tim

  9. Great work from the all at Identity. New website is looking lovely!

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